DOES THE HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICE’S RULE BANNING ABORTION REFERALS UNDER TITLE X VIOLATE THE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURE ACT?

BACKGROUND

In 1970, Congress enacted Title X of the Public Health Service Act “to promote public health and welfare by expanding, improving, and better coordinating the family planning services and population research activities of the Federal Government[.]” Under the act, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is “authorized to make grants to and enter into contracts with public or nonprofit private entities to assist in the establishment and operation of voluntary family planning projects which shall offer a broad range of acceptable and effective family planning methods and services (including natural family planning methods, infertility services, and services for adolescents).” The Act specifically states that “none of the funds appropriated under this subchapter shall be used in programs where abortion is a method of family planning.”

Over the past 50 years, HHS has interpreted this specific provision in different ways. In 1972, HHS interpreted this section as “not only as prohibiting the provision of abortion but also prohibiting Title X projects from in any way promoting or encouraging abortion as a method of family planning.” 53 Fed. Reg. 2922-01, 2923. In 1981, HHS went a step further and included “nondirective” counseling upon request for information on abortions, foster care, and other options. 53 Fed. Reg. at 2923. The interpretation of this subsection has changed several times through different administrations. Under the Trump administration, in 2018, HHS promulgated a rule that “a title X project may not perform, promote, refer for, or support abortion as a method of family planning, nor take any other affirmative action to assist a patient to secure such an abortion.” The rule further states that a pregnant woman must be referred to a health care provider for prenatal care and a physician may not refer the patient for an abortion, even if that is the patient’s desire.

THE ISSUE

Under Title X of the Public Health Service Act, did the Department of Health and Human Services have authority to promulgate a Final Rule banning service providers who receive federal money from referring patients for abortions?

THE SPLIT

The Fourth and Ninth Circuits have interpreted the subsection regarding the provision prohibiting abortion as a means of family planning. The Fourth Circuit claims that HHS was arbitrary and capricious in its rulemaking thus violating the Administrative Procedure Act (APA), while the Ninth Circuit upheld the Final Rule.

The Fourth Circuit

The Mayor and City Council of Baltimore filed suit against Alex Azar II, Secretary of HHS, alleging that the Final Rule violated the APA. In Chevron v. Natural Resources Defense Council (1984), the Supreme Court established a two-step test to determine if an agency should be given deference in a rulemaking. The first step is to determine whether the statute under which the rule was promulgated is ambiguous. The second step is to determine if the agency acted in an arbitrary and capricious manner in promulgating the rule and if the agency interpreted the statute in a reasonable manner. The Fourth Circuit, en banc, in Mayor & City Council of Baltimore v. Azar (2020), held that the Final Rule was arbitrary and capricious because HHS “inadequately explained its decision ‘to disagree with comments by every major medical organization regarding the Final Rule’s contravention of medical ethics’ . . . and inadequately considered the ‘likely costs and benefits of the physical separation requirement.’” The court asserted that HHS failed to consider all of the nation’s major medical organizations concerns when promulgating the rule. Further, the court found that the agency was “arbitrary and capricious because ‘the administrative record reflects comments estimating the likely cost of the requirement far exceeds HHS’s estimate of $30,000.’” Moreover, the court determined that the rule is unlawful as it violates the “nondirective” counseling requirement in Title X programs because mandating prenatal care is a form of “directive” counseling. Lastly, the court held that the rule interfered with physician-patient communications.

The Ninth Circuit

Contrary to the Fourth Circuit’s holding, the Ninth Circuit upheld the Final Rule promulgated by HHS. In State of California v. Azar (2020), the court distinguished between counseling and referrals. The court held that providers “‘may discuss abortion’ so long as ‘the counselor neither refers for, nor encourages, abortion’” thus, the “nondirective” counseling provision was not violated. Furthermore, the court asserted that the agency was reasonable in its interpretation of Title X and was not arbitrary and capricious in promulgating the rule. Under Chevron step two, the court deferred to the “agency’s expertise in identifying the appropriate course of action.”

LOOKING FORWARD

The Final Rule promulgated by HHS under the Trump administration is an attempt by the administration to limit a woman’s right to abortion. Title X mainly serves low-income families and people of color. According to Planned Parenthood, 21% of Title X recipients identify as African American or Black and nearly 32% identify as Latino. The Final Rule will most adversely impact these populations. In cases where there is a circuit split, the Supreme Court often becomes the deciding factor. The Supreme Court will be the final word in whether HHS’s rule was promulgated in a valid manner if they decide to hear the case. The Trump administration filed a petition for writ of certiorari to the Supreme Court in Azar v. Mayor & City Council of Baltimore, but the case has not yet been listed for conference. Only time will tell if the Supreme Court will hear this case. Additionally, with the new administration taking office, the case may be become mute if the rule is rescinded or is amended to allow abortion referrals.