Welcome, dear readers!

We call it Sunday Splits. Each week (but only on Sundays!) we will post a short discussion about a “circuit split.” For the uninitiated, a circuit split results when a federal circuit court of appeals rules differently on the same legal question as another court of appeals. These “splits” lead to a very enticing prospect—Supreme Court review.

We are a group of law students who specialize in Supreme Court litigation. Our organization, the Emory Law School Supreme Court Advocacy Program (ELSSCAP), files briefs exclusively at the high Court, so we follow legal news and developments closely. We have started this blog to highlight interesting issues that one day may end up before the Nine.

In these pages—screen?—we will organize and describe important circuit splits that we think are worthy of appearing before the high Court. (And some that are perhaps less worthy, or consequential, but nonetheless interesting). We are just beginning this journey, and we acknowledge at the outset that this is an ambitious experiment. If we are successful, however, we hope this blog will be a definitive repository of the issues that may soon be heard before the Court.

Before we begin, a brief word on our intended audience:

  • First, we hope this blog can be a resource for practicing attorneys who may bring cases to the Court. If that describes you, then we hope we can organize our splits so that you can find your match.
  • Second, to the legal academy, we hope to be a resource for professors and aspiring writers who look to these pages for article and comment ideas. If that describes you, we invite you in turn to share your ideas with us at elsscap@emory.edu.
  • Third, to the parties in litigation—perhaps you have lost an appeal at a federal circuit court of appeals, or a state supreme court, and the legal issue you face is described here. If so, we invite you to tell us about your case using our intake form (also available on our website), and we will let you know if we can help you.

This blog is not affiliated with Emory University, and we provide no legal advice, but we will do our best to provide engaging commentary.

That is all, for now – may the blogging begin!

It is so ordered.

Hamp Watson, director of ELSSCAP, Emory Law Class of 2017